Stefan Stenudd
Stefan Stenudd
About me
I'm a Swedish writer of fiction and non-fiction books in both Swedish and English. I'm also an artist, a historian of ideas and an aikido instructor.



THE GREEK PHILOSOPHERS

Introduction

Thales

Anaximander

Anaximenes

Pherecydes of Syros

Pythagoras

Xenophanes

Theagenes

Hecataeus

Heraclitus

Pindar

Parmenides

Anaxagoras

Empedocles

Herodotus

Gorgias

Melissus

Protagoras

Euripides

Prodicus of Ceos

Leucippus

Democritus

Critias

Antisthenes

Diagoras of Melos

Plato

Aristotle

Epicurus

Euhemerus

Table of the Greek Philosophers

Literature

The book


ARISTOTLE

Aristotle - life and work

Aristotle's Poetics

Aristotle's Cosmology


Life Energy Encyclopedia, by Stefan Stenudd.

Life Energy Encyclopedia
by Stefan Stenudd. Qi, prana, spirit, and other life forces around the world explained and compared. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.

Tao Te Ching - The Taoism of Lao Tzu Explained, by Stefan Stenudd.

Tao Te Ching
The Taoism of Lao Tzu Explained. The great Chinese classic, translated and extensively commented by Stefan Stenudd. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.



Stenudd's Blog


Cosmos of the Ancients

Comsos of the Ancients

The Greek Philosophers on Myth and Cosmology



Anaximenes


A naximenes (flourished circa 546 BC), the pupil of Anaximander, specified the boundless to have the element air, being that substance of which all is really made, also the gods and all things divine. He regarded air as this all encompassing ether, because: "Air is near to the incorporeal" and also it is never exhausted, though all are generated by breathing it.



     When the air is uniform it is not visible, but when set in motion, when turning hot or cold, when moistened, it gets perceivable shapes. It is always moving and changing, or there would not be so many things forming in it. When dissolved, it becomes fire, when compressed water, and when further condensed earth, lastly stone, its most condensed form.


Anaximenes

     The soul, too, is air, and that which keeps the body intact. Aëtios quotes him stating:

     As our soul, which is air, holds us together, so do breath and air surround the whole universe.

     Like the cosmos of Anaximander, that of his student is in little need of the gods. The universe works by its own machinery, creating and upholding everything within it - including the gods. This is an astronomical order in no need of outward influence.

Literature
Freeman, Kathleen, Ancilla to The Pre-Socratic Philosophers, Oxford 1952.
Kahn, Charles H., Anaximander and the Origins of Greek Cosmology, New York 1960.

© Stefan Stenudd 2000


Cosmos of the Ancients, by Stefan Stenudd.

Cosmos of the Ancients - the Book

The material on this website about the Greek philosophers and what they thought about cosmology, myth, and the gods, is now a book. It can be ordered at the Internet bookstores - printed or as a Kindle ebook. Both contain the footnotes with additional explanations as well as literary sources. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.



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