Stefan Stenudd
Stefan Stenudd
About me
I'm a Swedish writer of fiction and non-fiction books in both Swedish and English. I'm also an artist, a historian of ideas and an aikido instructor.



THE GREEK PHILOSOPHERS

Introduction

Thales

Anaximander

Anaximenes

Pherecydes of Syros

Pythagoras

Xenophanes

Theagenes

Hecataeus

Heraclitus

Pindar

Parmenides

Anaxagoras

Empedocles

Herodotus

Gorgias

Melissus

Protagoras

Euripides

Prodicus of Ceos

Leucippus

Democritus

Critias

Antisthenes

Diagoras of Melos

Plato

Aristotle

Epicurus

Euhemerus

Table of the Greek Philosophers

Literature

The book


ARISTOTLE

Aristotle - life and work

Aristotle's Poetics

Aristotle's Cosmology


Life Energy Encyclopedia, by Stefan Stenudd.

Life Energy Encyclopedia
by Stefan Stenudd. Qi, prana, spirit, and other life forces around the world explained and compared. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.

Tao Te Ching - The Taoism of Lao Tzu Explained, by Stefan Stenudd.

Tao Te Ching
The Taoism of Lao Tzu Explained. The great Chinese classic, translated and extensively commented by Stefan Stenudd. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.



Stenudd's Blog



Cosmos of the Ancients

Comsos of the Ancients

The Greek Philosophers on Myth and Cosmology



Antisthenes


A ntisthenes (circa 446-366 BC), called the Cynic, student of Gorgias and then Socrates, is often in the literature mentioned as one to interpret the gods as personifications of natural forces. In the remainder of his works, though, there is little to support it. He wrote about myths, and judging from the long list of his books in Diogenes Laertius, he did so repeatedly - but a majority of the titles obviously deal with the ethics of living, of personal ideals for man.



     This includes the legendary figure he seems to have pondered the most, Heracles, whose nobility, virtue and heroic qualities were like honey to the mind of Antisthenes. Personal virtue and stamina is also the subject in practically all of the quotes from him, which Diogenes Laertius includes in his text, spanning several pages.


Antisthenes

     Concerning the gods, ancient sources claim that he made a distinction between the god of nature and the multitude of gods worshiped by men. Cicero complains:

     Antisthenes also, in his book entitled The Natural Philosopher, says that while there are many gods of popular belief, there is one god in nature, so depriving divinity of all meaning or substance.

     This view would, of course, give Antisthenes ambiguous feelings about the myths of Homer and Hesiod, but contains no indication of any particularly allegorical interpretation of them. The passage in Xenophon's Symposium (3.5), regarding 'underlying meanings' (hyponoiai) in Homer's texts, usually referred to, actually shows Socrates holding such views, whereas Antisthenes hardly seems to be familiar with the term. His interest in the myths remains ethical.

Literature
Diogenes Laertius, Lives of Eminent Philosophers, translated by R. D. Hicks, volume II, Loeb, London 1950.
Cicero, De natura deorum, 1.13.32, translated by H. Rackham, Loeb, London 1979.
Rankin, H.D., Antisthenes Sokratikos, Amsterdam 1986.

© Stefan Stenudd 2000


Cosmos of the Ancients, by Stefan Stenudd.

Cosmos of the Ancients - the Book

The material on this website about the Greek philosophers and what they thought about cosmology, myth, and the gods, is now a book. It can be ordered at the Internet bookstores - printed or as a Kindle ebook. Both contain the footnotes with additional explanations as well as literary sources. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.



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