Stefan Stenudd
Stefan Stenudd
About me
I'm a Swedish writer of fiction and non-fiction books in both Swedish and English. I'm also an artist, a historian of ideas and an aikido instructor.



THE GREEK PHILOSOPHERS

Introduction

Thales

Anaximander

Anaximenes

Pherecydes of Syros

Pythagoras

Xenophanes

Theagenes

Hecataeus

Heraclitus

Pindar

Parmenides

Anaxagoras

Empedocles

Herodotus

Gorgias

Melissus

Protagoras

Euripides

Prodicus of Ceos

Leucippus

Democritus

Critias

Antisthenes

Diagoras of Melos

Plato

Aristotle

Epicurus

Euhemerus

Table of the Greek Philosophers

Literature

The book


ARISTOTLE

Aristotle - life and work

Aristotle's Poetics

Aristotle's Cosmology


Life Energy Encyclopedia, by Stefan Stenudd.

Life Energy Encyclopedia
by Stefan Stenudd. Qi, prana, spirit, and other life forces around the world explained and compared. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.


Tao Te Ching - The Taoism of Lao Tzu Explained, by Stefan Stenudd.
Tao Te Ching
The Taoism of Lao Tzu Explained. The great Chinese classic, translated and extensively commented by Stefan Stenudd. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.





Stenudd's Blog





Cosmos of the Ancients

Comsos of the Ancients

The Greek Philosophers on Myth and Cosmology



Democritus


W hat Leucippus thought about cosmology and its atomic structure, is generally assumed to be identical with the views of his student Democritus (c. 460-357 BC), who elaborated further on the subject, being the one mostly quoted on it. Diogenes Laertius gives a long list of books written by Democritus, dividing them into the groups ethics, virtue, physics, "no head", mathematics, literature and music, and the arts. Most famous were The Great Diacosmos (world order) and The Lesser Diacosmos, though Diogenes says the former is by some attributed to Leucippus.




Democritus, by Brugghen 1628.

     Although Democritus made the theory of atoms a basis for all things in the world, including for example color as a difference in surface of the atoms and taste a difference in shape, he held, according to Aristotle, a modest view toward learning: "Either there is no truth or it is concealed from us." This may be a slight misinterpretation of his thoughts on perception:

     We know nothing accurately in reality, but (only) as it changes according to the bodily condition, and the constitution of those things that flow upon (the body) and impinge upon it.


Democritus

     Since all the senses work on inflow of atoms carrying their respective characteristics, to Democritus it was obvious that one could not say to know reality as it was, but only as its fragments reached its observers. Regarding knowledge itself, he seems not to have been as modest as Aristotle has it.

     No more than his teacher did Democritus involve the gods in his cosmos, and so also with him it can be said that we have no statement of his swearing to it, but at least in all cosmological matters he should be regarded as an atheist.

Literature
Aristotle, Metaphysics, 1009b, translated by Hugh Lawson-Tancred, London 1998.
Freeman, Kathleen, Ancilla to The Pre-Socratic Philosophers, Oxford 1952.

© Stefan Stenudd 2000


Cosmos of the Ancients, by Stefan Stenudd.

Cosmos of the Ancients - the Book

The material on this website about the Greek philosophers and what they thought about cosmology, myth, and the gods, is now a book. It can be ordered at the Internet bookstores - printed or as a Kindle ebook. Both contain the footnotes with additional explanations as well as literary sources. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.



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