Stefan Stenudd
Stefan Stenudd
About me
I'm a Swedish writer and aikido instructor, 6 dan Aikikai Shihan, former Vice Chairman of the International Aikido Federation. I've practiced aikido since 1972. I also teach the sword art iaido. Here's my budo bio.



Aikido
AIKIDO PRACTICE

Aikido Techniques

Attacks in Aikido

Ikkyo complete

Tantodori - knife defense

Ki exercises

Koshinage

Kotegaeshi

Yonkyo

Nikyo

Sankyo

Jo 31 Kata

Aikibatto sword exercises

Aikido Video Clips

Aikido Photos

My seminars


AIKIDO THEORY

Aikido Glossary

Ki energy

Tanden, the Center

Aikido Inks

Aikido as Self-Defense

Running a Dojo

Aikido is True

Osensei and Einstein

AikiWeb Columns

Aikido Links

Visitor Response

Aikido på svenska


AIKIDO BOOKS

Attacks in Aikido

Aikido Principles

Die deutsche Version meines Aikido-Buches online

My Aikido Book in Czech

My Aikido Book in Swedish

Other Aikido Books


Aikibatto, by Stefan Stenudd.

Aikibatto
by Stefan Stenudd. The aikibatto sword and staff exercises for aikido students explained, with practical and spiritual aspects of the sword arts, equipment for training, and more. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.


QI - increase your life energy, by Stefan Stenudd.
Qi Energy
Increase your life energy, by Stefan Stenudd. The life energy qi (also chi or ki), with exercises on how to awaken, increase, and use it. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.





Stenudd's Blog





Aikido Techniques

Tanto dori

Knife defense

Aikido techniques: Tantodori.
Tantodori: all attacks and aikido techniques. Click the image to see the table enlarged.


Notes on tantodori

  1. Some techniques should be excluded from tantodori, because they lack control of the tanto.
  2. In tantodori, the techniques should be practical and as safe as possible - deviations from this should be clearly pointed out in training.
  3. Tantodori should always be done with good control of the tanto, and end with disarming.
  4. The techniques should also be executable against a double edged tanto.
  5. Returning the tanto to uke, should be done with care.
  6. Entrance on shomenuchi should also protect against yokomenuchi, and vice versa, since it can be very difficult for tori to perceive which one of them uke will attack with. Same with chudantsuki/jodantsuki.
  7. Jodantsuki is not necessary to include with the basic in tantodori, but good to practice now and then. Tori should handle it the same way as chudantsuki.
  8. Tsuki can be done with uke holding the tanto edge down, edge up, or edge to the side.
  9. Shomenuchi attack is usually done with the same grip on the tanto as in tsuki, but in yokomenuchi the grip is reversed. Either grip can be used for both attack forms.
  10. Ushiro chudantsuki is not exactly basic, but should be tried. It is most meaningful in gotai, from a static starting point, with uke already up close from behind, doing tsuki only upon tori's movement.
  11. Certainly, tantodori can be practiced in suwariwaza and hanmi handachiwaza, but that is not to be regarded as basic. Anyway, the solutions are quite the same as for tachiwaza.
  12. Additional comments on tantodori techniques are below.
  13. More on tantodori here.
  14. Video clips of tantodori ikkyo here.
  15. Aikido glossary here.




Iriminage on different knife attacks. More tantodori here.


Comments on tantodori

  1. IKKYO should be done with great care, so as not to get one's wrist or hand cut by the knife. Therefore, the gokyo style grab of uke's wrist is often the most trustworthy - but it is also possible to do ikkyo with the lower arm meeting, like in unarmed shomenuchi and other attacks. If the attacking arm is low, as in chudantsuki, the gokyo grip is the most practical.
  2. NIKYO in tantodori must be done with tori's arms extended, instead of pressing uke's hand to tori's shoulder, for safety reasons. Also, the regular nikyo pinning at the end of the technique is questionable - it is better to do an ikkyo pinning, or a standing kotegeashi pinning, to disarm uke. See also the comments on ikkyo above.
  3. SANKYO in tantodori can be done disarming the uke already at the sankyo twisting of uke's wrist. The sankyo end pinning is not equally safe for disarming. The gokyo style grip on uke's wrist (as explained in the comments on ikkyo above) is not functional when doing sankyo, which has to start with the lower arm meeting.
  4. YONKYO is not really recommendable in tantodori, for safety reasons. It can be done, but it is not easy. The yonkyo grip is difficult to apply when uke holds a tanto, and the disarming in awkward. When the technique is practiced, this should be kept in mind.
  5. GOKYO is the most basic pinning technique in tantodori, because it is pretty much designed for that purpose, all the way to the end pinning and disarming.
  6. HIJIKIME OSAE is not recommendable in tantodori, for safety reasons. It involves holding uke's knifehand close to tori's neck and chest. But the technique can be modified for increased safety. Some aikido teachers are quite confident about it.
  7. KAITEN OSAE is not recommendable in tantodori, for safety reasons. It involves uke's knifehand moving close to tori's face, neck and chest.
  8. KOKYUHO in tantodori should be done so that it ends with disarming uke. Mostly, a kotegaeshi style ending works the best. Since it is a little tricky to get a good control of uke's tanto hand in kokyuho, it should be regarded as advanced.
  9. KOKYUNAGE in tantodori should be done so that it ends with disarming uke. This means holding on to uke through the throw. Mostly, a kotegaeshi style ending works the best.
  10. IRIMINAGE in tantodori should be done so that it ends with disarming uke. This means keeping contact with uke through the throw. Mostly, a kotegaeshi style ending works the best.
  11. SHIHONAGE in tantodori should be done so that it includes disarming uke. This can be done right before the throw, or immediately after it.
  12. KOTEGAESHI is usually regarded as the easiest and most practical throwing technique in tantodori. It leads to a pinning, where disarming uke can be done in an uncomplicated way.
  13. TENCHINAGE in tantodori should be done so that it ends with disarming uke. This means holding on to uke through the throw. A kotegaeshi style ending works the best.
  14. KAITENNAGE is not very practical at all in tantodori, since it does not lead to a pinning where uke can be disarmed. Therefore, it should not be included in the basics.
  15. KOSHINAGE in tantodori should be done so that it ends with disarming uke. This means holding on to uke through the throw. Mostly, a kotegaeshi style ending works the best.
  16. UDEKIMENAGE in tantodori should be done so that it ends with disarming uke. This means holding on to uke through the throw. A kotegaeshi style ending works the best.
  17. JUJIGARAMI does not really apply to tantodori, since it is difficult to get that control of both uke's arms.
  18. USHIRO KIRIOTOSHI is not practical in tantodori, since it lacks the control of uke's knife arm.
  19. AIKINAGE should not be applied to tantodori, for safety reasons. Also, it completely lacks the control of uke's knife arm.
  20. AIKI OTOSHI does not apply to tantodori, because of how uke attacks, and because of the lack of control of uke's knife arm.


LISTS OF TECHNIQUES

  1. Tachiwaza - mae (standing, attacks from the front)
  2. Tachiwaza - ushiro (standing, attacks from the rear)
  3. Suwariwaza (tori and uke sitting)
  4. Hanmi handachiwaza (tori sitting, uke standing)
  5. Tantodori (defense against knife)
  6. Tachidori (defense against sword)
  7. Jodori (defense against staff)
  8. Kaeshiwaza (counter techniques)
  9. Henkawaza (changed techniques)
  10. Kogeki (attacks in aikido)

My Aikido Books

Aikido Principles, by Stefan Stenudd.

Aikido Principles

Basic Concepts of the Peaceful Martial Art, by Stefan Stenudd. Aikido principles, philosophy, and basic ideas. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.

Attacks in Aikido, by Stefan Stenudd.

Attacks in Aikido

How to do kogeki, the attack techniques, by Stefan Stenudd. All the attack techniques in aikido explained, and how to do them correctly. Click the image to see the book at Amazon.